My friend Alex Green runs a very cool music website called Caught In The Carousel. I would highly recommend checking it out for anyone interested in all things about new music. There are great pieces on new artists with free music, podcasts and insightful and personal interviews.

This week The Carousel if devoting four days entirely to The Doors. Senior Writer Paul Gleason has interviewed Doors drummer John Densmore. Their conversation slips easily into the sublime. Check it out HERE.

Paul has also written a new review of When You’re Strange which I found equally astute and engaging. Check it out HERE.

I also spoke at length with Paul about the making of the film. Our interview appears HERE.

Posted by:Tom

2 thoughts on “ 107. Four Days of DOORS ”

  1. Great info and interview, Tom 🙂

    I knew about all the distribution nightmares but didn’t realize the TV/PBS/DVD aspect affected what kinds of theaters WYS played in. It makes sense, now. I never could figure out why WYS didn’t play at one of the 6-8 indie theaters we have in Atlanta. Instead, it played at a university campus movie theater, and I had to look up where it was and how to get there since I’d never heard of the place before. Still, at least it did play in my city.

    And I am very glad I drove the 2 hours to Athens, GA where it played on Univ of GA’s campus in their indie theater. *There* it was packed, the people loved it, and the screening was done in sync with a music fest weekend around the area.

    I think it would be great to see it released on the big screen again. Meanwhile, how is your music coming along? Can we see a CD soon? *hopes*

    Elaine

  2. Hey Tom,

    Fantastic interiews. I can testify that the experience of seeing When You’re Strange on the big screen is a vital one. I had the pleasure of reviewing it at the Dublin Film Festival, it was held in the biggest screening room in the country, projected onto the biggest screen we have, it was completely sold out, the sound was absolutely amazing. I was never a big Doors fan, but seeing the film in that situation was nothing short of a revelation, and instilled in me a new found respect for their work and as musicians. Perhaps it was the quality of the sound in the theatre, but hearing Krieger’s guitar in such clarity made me both envious of his talent and intrigued to hear more and more.

    Like the best cinematic experiences, I left the cinema feeling kind of shaken, feeling like I seen had an important work…this may sound a bit strange but it reminded of the time I had first seen The Exorcist. The cinematic experience is crucial to a film, and When You’re Strange deserves to be re-released to be seen as it should, I’m delighted to hear Densmore’s plans for this. Unfortunately it would have to compete with “Wolverine: The Puppy Years – Part 1.25 and a Half” or some such.

    Wayne

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